JOURNALING · Organize Self and Home · Productivity

Templates Create Efficiency in Your Journal’s To-Do List

If your journal also houses your to-do list, then efficiency in creating those lists is necessary to get the job done.

One of the biggest culprits of to-do list failure, of not achieving the goal, is the tedium of having to write and rewrite your list on tasks to complete on a regular basis. Delay writing burnout by creating templates.

If you know that you will create a to-do list every day or every week in your journal, it might be a good idea to type a list template that you can print and affix to your paper journal.e.g. If you have a weekly to-do list for the foreseeable future that has as its focus Housing goals, Blogging goals, and Financial goals, then type those headings in a simple table, leaving blanks for you to write in the specific goal each week.

If you are using a digital journal for your list, create a to-do list template that you can copy and paste every day or every week.

Continue tweaking your journal and your lists until it fits your life. Pay attention to what fatigues you about your writing and what brings you  a sense of well-being.

And remember that what worked for you in a different phase of life might need to be tweaked for your current phase of life.

Peace,

Deborah

 

BLOGGING · Brain Drops · Productivity · Vlogging

Roberto Blake on Being Prolific and Why Steve Jobs Should Have Been a Vlogger

One of my inspirations for publishing a blog post 6 days per week is Roberto Blake -a daily vlogger and graphic designer who discusses entrepreneurship regularly. His Medium post on Your First 1000 Pieces of Content (Read it by clicking here. ), discusses how to become an influencer through being prolific.  I have a long way to go before this website and its adjacent platforms has 1000 pieces of content. However, enjoying the journey is half the fun.

Also of interest is this video where Blake says he wishes Steve Jobs had been a daily vlogger. His argument is that we could then study his early moments closely as Jobs struggled to create Apple Computers and revolutionize accessible communication. The idea, I suppose, is to inspire the rest of us to tell our story , document our journey, because this information can be useful to other people.

You and I have talked about this recently, about how your stories can be a gift to the world (click here to read it). You don’t have to be the founder of a legendary company like Jobs, to be useful.

Blake goes on to say that quantity (being prolific) can produce quality eventually. Practice helps. I would add, that quantity can produce quality if you are paying attention to results and tweaking to make a better outcome as you go along.

What do you think about quantity producing quality eventually? And do you think Steve Jobs should have been a daily vlogger? That’s debatable. I think some of his legend is partly because he was enigmatic.

Sincerely,

Deborah

P.S. We’ve already discussed how Seth Godin – another person known for daily creations -creates his blog posts every day. Click here to read that explanation.

P.P.S. Out of all the people that I would have loved to have seen with a Youtube channel, it’s Orson Welles. He was always frustrated about the expense of films and the fact that you needed, as he said, an army of people to get the job done. The director of Citizen Kane could have elevated the craft of internet videos with his experience and imagination.

BLOGGING · Motivation · Productivity

David Bowie on an Artist’s Popularity

There is an illustrated interview series on Youtube called Blank on Blank. One of the interviews I’ve recently run across is of rock star David Bowie on the subject of popularity and your own artistry.  What he says might apply to writers/bloggers, as well.

“An audience appreciation is only going to be periodic at the best of times. You fall in and out of favor continually. I don’t think it should be something one should be looking for. I think you should turn around at the end of the day and say, ‘I really like that piece of work,’ or ‘That piece of work [is terrible].’ Not, ‘Was that popular or wasn’t that popular?'”

This goes back to what we’ve said before about social media likes and what to do if you experience anxiety over becoming less popular in your art, or when someone unsubscribes from your blog.

The idea is to have a sense of purpose beyond being liked, and that’s what Bowie seems to say here. Making the best work you can should be enough; the rest is gravy.

Peace,

Deborah

Motivation · PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT · Productivity

Not a Morning Person? This might help.

When you are told during childhood that you are a night owl, not a morning person – that you are more energized at night then during the day- for the longest time you stick to that identity like a gnat on an overripe peach. It also means that you have difficulty waking up for school without being grumpy.

Doomed. I thought I was doomed to dislike mornings forever. Then, as a teen, I stumbled upon a solution. I set the alarm to sound -not the default buzz- but one of my favorite albums- The Best of Tchaikovsky. When you hear the cannons of the “1812 Overture,” you do not remain asleep. It was fun.

Later in life,  I found the same problem occurred, only this time I did not want to go to work. I would go anyway, of course, and do an excellent job. However,  I realized the issue all this time had not been mornings, but with forcing myself to live a life that I did not want. With this newer situation, as in my teens, mornings became easier when I would do this one thing – front load my favorite things to do.

I know we are supposed to reward ourselves only after a job well done, if at all. I know we are supposed to reserve dessert for last. (That’s what we are told.)

Well, to get myself up and excited to be alive, I would eat mental dessert first. I would wake up and conduct my morning rituals, work on only the things that were important to me. This might mean getting up super early, but when you are getting up to work on your own projects, life is great; it’s not such a problem.

You are awakening to do things that you like. Then, through the course of a day,  you make your way to the job. Then, you go home and, again participate in what you like. The job you may or may not like is sandwiched between a life that fits you.

Then, you gradually make plans to reduce that middle part – the part that doesn’t fit your life.

Today, the title of night owl does not seem to fit any more, nor do I wish to replace it with another label. It is more accurate to say this: I do as I please when awake.  I am far less interested in the circadian rhythm label.

How about you? How have you weathered the mornings if you do not like them?

Peace Be With you,

Deborah

 

Overcoming Obstacles · Productivity

On Making Progress

The goal here is usually to write three times per week – Monday, Wednesday, Friday – for about a year, then scale back to once per week. I missed Wednesday due to pure fear. I have ideas, lists of things to talk about,  an editorial calendar, but nothing sparked my interest.

A problem with an editorial calendar is that when you make the calendar, you are interested in writing about that topic. When the day comes to write it, you are no longer interested. Does that ever happen to you?

Is the inner Scanner/Hummingbird/Multi-Potentialite sabotaging me again with her waning interest in a project? That’s a frightening thought.

Then worry sets in about reaching the goals, whether my system of organization is the right one, whether the articles are perfect enough. It’s a mess.

Nina Amir’s article on perfectionism spurred me on today. Mrs. Amir says to concentrate on making progress more than on making perfection. The author gives us a four-step program for that.  Head on over to her website to read the article titled “Make Progress, Not Perfection.”

Learning to wade through the mediocre or troubling parts of your project is always tough.  Sometimes you forget that your blog is necessary. To get through this, I find inspiration in the thoughts of other people who understand the struggle – whether a blog (like that of Mrs. Amir), or a book, or a close friend; they spur me on,  despite the problems.

Who or what spurs YOU on?

 

Sincerely,

Deborah